"Girlfriends of the Court"

Archive for the ‘Balance’ Category

S|M| i |L|E-ing

In blogs, higher education, law students, legal education, Social Media on July 20, 2014 at 9:21 pm

Why not start a new blog you say?

S|M| i |L|E Social Media in Legal Education is a new collaborative project by Australian legal academics. The project aims to promote and support the integration of social media into legal education, starting as a resource and repository for the ongoing explorations of academic collaborators, Kate Galloway, Kristoffer Greaves, Melissa de Zwart and Melissa Castan; others will be involved too.  It aims to be a useful resource for academics, ECRs and HDR students, law students, and legal practitioners. Please take a look at the libraries there.

Legal education, digital, social media,

Advertisements

It’s more than the vibe; blogging the Constitution

In blogs, legal education, Public Law, Social Media, twitter, women on September 27, 2013 at 9:23 pm
Constitution, blog, public law

“in summing up, it’s the constitution, it’s Mabo, it’s justice, it’s law,
it’s the vibe and no, that’s it, it’s the vibe…. I rest my case.” **

 

I’ve been procrastiblogging by compiling a list of the best Australian constitutional law blogs, for both the legal academic and the student/scholar. There are now a number of high quality academic blogs that offer case or issues analysis sometimes within days (or hours) of a major constitutional decision being handed down. Whilst many students are understandably wary of using blogs for research assignments and study, I am confident of the authoritative and scholarly nature of these ones. Read on… Read the rest of this entry »

If it please the court:

In Balance, Education, Time management, women on March 9, 2013 at 9:31 pm
What's new doll? *

What’s new doll? *

Welcome to Amicae Curiae, a blog for ‘Girlfriends of the Court’. The blog was intended to discuss the role of women in the law, in legal education, as students, as academics, and within the legal profession, and  we also discuss other issues. There are many posts on a variety of topics relating to legal life throughout this blog, but here is a quick guide to our most popular ones. Read on… Read the rest of this entry »

After 20 years, do the numbers stack up?

In Advocacy, Barristers, Career, Education, Hegemony, maternity, Solicitors, women on December 5, 2012 at 1:26 pm
What do we have to do to make a difference? *

What do we have to do to make a difference? *

Nearly twenty years ago, the Australian Law Reform Commission, in its report “Equality before the Law: Women’s Equality (ALRC Report 69 Part 2)” examined the place of  Women in the Legal Profession, and said

Women make up 50% of law school graduates, and 25% of the legal profession as a whole. However, women leave the profession at a much higher rate than men, and they are clustered in the lower ranks of the profession. [footnotes omitted]

Fast forward two decades and the VEOHRC has released its latest report into research on women in the law, entitled  Changing the rules: The experiences of female lawyers in Victoria.  This report focused on discrimination, sexual harassment and the accommodation of parental and carer responsibilities.  Read the rest of this entry »

Don’t Call Me Girl. I’m a Woman.

In Career, Guest Post, media, TV, twitter, Uncategorized, women on August 1, 2012 at 10:20 am

Is this how we wish to represent women athletes? (image courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Twitter has been abuzz since the start of the Olympic coverage, with the observation of Australian commentators’ use of ‘girl/s’ to describe women competitors.  The complaint that women have about this language is its capacity to diminish women’s athletic achievement and infantilise them.  Many disagree with this interpretation, pointing out that our male athletes are also called ‘boys’ or ‘lads’.  So why do many women feel so strongly about being called ‘girls’ in this context?

Read the rest of this entry »

Opportunity knocks more than once

In Balance, higher education, legal education, women on June 21, 2012 at 5:04 pm

Ana felt it was time to stretch her academic wings

When the southern hemisphere winter sets in and the days are short and bleak, its time to start planning to get out of the doldrums and into a conference. But how do you get a paper accepted by the convenors? And what if you are an inexperienced public speaker?

Flora Poste Writes has a very useful summary of tips and advice for those preparing to present or attend at a conference, and similarly the Thesis Whisperer has shared her slides on Academic Conferences: A beginners’ guide. Over at Hook & Eye Amiee Morrison (digiwonk) has a terrific post that reminds us that Conference Papers are like Movie Trailers. Her key points ~ “Hit the highlights, Show the chase scene, Simplify the plot”. That’s good advice! [read on…]

Read the rest of this entry »

Lawyers’ Lingerie League: Clothing as Control?

In Career, fashion, media, shoes, women on June 13, 2012 at 8:59 am
Cassie McRichie - page 8.jpeg

Single-sculler Cassie McRichie, founder of the Albert Park Lake women’s rowing club, wasn’t troubled by an overly sexualised costume in 1900.

The last couple of weeks has seen the Lingerie Football League (‘LFL’) in the news.  If you’re uncertain about what this entails, it is ‘Hot babes in lingerie playing footy!’ according to the Triple M website promoting it. (See also a spectator’s view here.)

Some commentators have decried the so-called sport as sexist, while others claim that this is snobbery.

So is it sexist?  If so, why?  Are there implications for women more broadly?

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Blawg Review #320 – A Call to Arms

In Advocacy, amusement, blogs, Diversity, women on May 7, 2012 at 2:01 pm

The Maid of Orleans and Women In Law: An Allegory

On this day in 1429 Jeanne D’Arc pulled an arrow from her own shoulder and returned, wounded, to lead the final charge thus ending the Siege of Orléans. Who was this heroic and infamous woman, and what is she doing in BlawgReview #320?  

If ever there was a symbol of leadership and sacrifice in the name of duty, it is the story of Joan of Arc. Living in an era during which women had no place at all in public life, she led French resistance and died doing so, having been tried and convicted of ‘insubordination and heterodoxy’ on 30 May, 1431. Read on… Read the rest of this entry »

Do Clothes Make the (Wo)Man?

In Career, fashion, Guest Post, legal education, shoes, women on April 29, 2012 at 10:32 am
fashion, law, blog

Are we just reproducing the dominant paradigm?     *Mattel

The Culture of Professional Dressing 

There’s been a lot of talk on this blog here and here amongst others, of women’s (and some men’s) experiences as legal practitioners, in terms of what to wear.  We could ask why these posts are so popular with readers.  Is it because women love clothes?  (I mean – you know what women are like, right?)  Perhaps.  However I have another theory.

It’s about culture – in particular, the dominant culture of the law. Read on. Read the rest of this entry »

Finding Australian Law Blogs

In Advocacy, amusement, blogs, Community, legal education, Procrastination on April 28, 2012 at 10:59 am
Law, blogs, blawgs, Australian law

Updating the Blog

Law blogs (blawgs?) are increasingly popular as a way for lawyers, law students and legal academics to communicate to new audiences, create communities of shared interests, and generally vent about the peculiarities of  the law. They are also one of the few ways people can access and exchange legal information and analysis for free (although there is a cost to the blogger, there is little cost to the bloggee). I recently had to hunt down a variety of  blogs for an article I was writing,  and I realised its hard to locate an up to date list of ‘Oz Blawgs’. Here is a list of the ones I found so far. It complements my list of Australian Legal tweeters here and Legal Info here. Read on Read the rest of this entry »

Australian Legal Footnotes: a quick and dirty guide

In Journals, law students, legal education, Procrastination on March 22, 2012 at 12:04 pm

Don't fall into plagiarism.

Have you ever wanted a quick and dirty guide to the main principles underlying the methods and motives for correct use of footnotes and citations in Australian law?

Legal citation has been referred to as a ‘peculiar human custom’.1 It allows a writer to refer to legal and non-legal authorities clearly and consistently, so as to support the arguments made, as well as to enable a reader locate the references. The purpose of providing references is to acknowledge sources of your writing, and demonstrate the breadth and depth of your research. We set out for you here* the shortest possible instructions on Australian legal footnotes style. Read the rest of this entry »

The law and … tights

In Barristers, fashion, Stockings, women on February 22, 2012 at 8:53 am

Is it time to toss the tights?

I was sorting through a box of materials the other day when I came across a picture of the solicitor Sue MacGregor in polka dot tights. Many of you will recall that in 1993, Justice Smithers castigated Ms MacGregor for coming to court in polka-dot stockings and a suit with a skirt that finished above the knee. For a feisty response, see Magistrate Jennifer Coate’s protest. [Read on] Read the rest of this entry »

Who Controls Women’s Bodies?

In Advocacy, Community, media, women on February 19, 2012 at 3:48 pm

My Body. My Business.

In my last post on Amicae Curiae in response to an article by Bettina Arndt, I described the way in which women were objectified in media whether or not they displayed their breasts.  It seems however that the media’s obsession with breasts is not going to go away.

In mainstream media, on Twitter and on Facebook, the last week or so has seen a constant stream of the kind of mixed messages and double standards that represent society’s view of women’s bodies. {read on} Read the rest of this entry »

30 sites in 30 slides (or why you should love your librarian)

In higher education, legal education, Procrastination, Social Media on November 27, 2011 at 8:28 pm
Social Media, law, research

Things have changed in your law library

We are all busy, and sometimes its hard to catch up with what is new and useful.  But some things are really worth taking a few minutes to check out. We asked Kay Tucker, the wonderful law librarian at the Monash Law Library, if we could post a link to her terrific presentation, “30 sites in 30 minutes”. Read on… Read the rest of this entry »

Tweet and Meet

In amusement, Meeting, mentoring, Procrastination, twitter on November 4, 2011 at 9:29 am
#melblawdrinks

Getaway from it all *

Whether it’s with a dirty martini, fruity mai-tai or a perfect manhattan, there is nothing like meeting colleagues for a soothing libation and convivial company.

We hear many dire reports of the sad, the mad and the bad aspects of legal study and practice, but its worth remembering one of the best parts of working in the law is the fabulous people you meet. In Sydney a group formed under the twitter tag #lawandmoredrinks. In London #TweetingLegals have been meeting regularly. But why has it taken so long for other Australian law types to coagulate over cocktails? Read On…

Read the rest of this entry »

Australian Legal Info on Twitter

In Community, community legal centres, legal rights, Procrastination, twitter, women on August 24, 2011 at 8:11 am

Your legal rights

Now continuing the quest to provide links for people looking to connect and communicate via twitter, here is the list of #auslaw community legal centres,  legal advocacy, legal info and academic law centres that use twitter. I have included not-for-profits and some providers of legal information, but have not included commercial law firms, politicians, university news accounts or nontweeting accounts (sorry @austlii). A list of personal accounts of Australian twegals are listed here.  A link to Australian government accounts is at the end. The short bios are those provided by the tweeters themselves. Read on… Read the rest of this entry »

64 (and more) Australian legal tweeters

In blogs, law, law students, legal education, Procrastination, twitter on August 14, 2011 at 9:30 pm

Staying connected

I have been on the lookout for a list of people using twitter to share news and views on Australian law (or in twitter terms #auslaw), mainly for the benefit of law (and legal studies) students who ask me for recommendations. You can follow people’s own curated ‘twitter lists’ that collate tweeters on different topics, but you need to know who to start following in order to make best use of lists. And perhaps this list may prompt some of our non-tweeting colleagues to start up the habit.

So below is my attempt at (an incomplete) listing those twegals who like to tweet (the little bios are the tweeters’ own). I would welcome any other suggestions, and if I have left you off inadvertently, or you don’t want to be here, please let me know.
Read the rest of this entry »

Distracted

In Procrastination, Time management on August 1, 2011 at 11:53 pm

When I last wrote about time management and having too much to do, Rebecca kindly suggested setting a writing target to be completed each day. Humph I thought how simple and obvious. And it has worked a treat (thanks Rebecca). Not only does the target give an immediate focus to the day but when the target is completed the day is free to ado all those other things that need to be done. What I have also noticed is the distraction of email.

Read on. Read the rest of this entry »

Women partners: the glass half full or half empty

In Barristers, Career, maternity, Solicitors, women on July 8, 2011 at 11:33 am

In its annual survey of women partners, the Australian reports that one third of new partners are women here. The numbers of women making partnership are steadily on the rise. The Australian also reports that ‘family proves no obstacle to career’, with firms increasingly accommodating the needs of lawyers with young families without requiring them to sacrifice their career aspirations. Great news it seems.

But …

Compare the insightful opinion piece by Roy Williams  here, which questions the compatibility of the values of the modern legal workplace with the aspirations of many young lawyers.

In blunt terms: an Australian commercial law firm is no longer, for most lawyers, an enjoyable place to work

He concludes with 4 propositions, the final one is that rather than a ‘maternity wall’  women use their ‘common sense’ to bail out via a ‘maternity escape-hatch’.

Do you agree?

The Very Good Wife

In amusement, Balance, Parenting, Solicitors, TV, women on July 7, 2011 at 3:27 pm
The Good Wife courtesy of CBS.com

The Good Wife photo courtesy CBS.com

I have to admit to missing the TV show The Good Wife. If you haven’t seen it, the show  stars Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick who assumes full responsibility for the financial well being of her family after her husband’s sex and political corruption scandal lands him in jail by entering a large law firm and restarting her original career as a defense attorney.

In many ways it is a ridiculous show but… I love the fact its about law and also has some older women characters struggling with life as well as legal issues.

Am I the only fan out there?

Whatever you do, don’t mention cupcakes!

In amusement, Procrastination, women on June 5, 2011 at 5:11 pm

TSA now scanning for cupcakes?

Was it funny because cupcakes are so nausiatingly trendy? Or because it invokes the image of sneaky spies baking girly pies? It has been widely reported that MI6 substituted a bomb recipe with a cupcake recipe, see Lowering the Bar here, or others here, and here.

And some funny responses from twitter:

Click below for more on this story…

Read the rest of this entry »

Law is funny, innit?

In Journals, Procrastination, women on May 27, 2011 at 6:13 pm


The law is serious business. Mostly. But when a kind soul (known to me only as @ReplevinforaCow) pointed me to the case below, I had a chuckle, and I thought you should chuckle with me:

The entire unabridged report of Denny v Radar Industries 1970 per J.H. GILLIS, Judge:

The appellant has attempted to distinguish the factual situation in this case from that in Renfroe v Higgins (citation omitted). He didn’t. We couldn’t. Affirmed. Costs to appellee.

Have you found a shorter, blunter judgment? If you are a journal nerd (like me) you may enjoy the World’s Greatest Law Review Article found here. Or the World’s Shortest Law Review Article here [shortest_law_review]. Keep reading by clicking the little red button below…

Like what you see? You can subscribe to this blog by scrolling to the bottom of the page, or

Read the rest of this entry »

Too much to do ….

In Balance, women on May 24, 2011 at 10:48 pm

I have had a busy week. Too many deadlines coming all at once. Being deadline adverse, the very existence of deadlines almost paralyses my thoughts.

I suspect something like this the constant dilemma of the modern lawyer. Too much to do and too little time. As some sort of solution, there are lots of interesting time management blogs.

Useful on how to use lists is:

http://www.thecompletelawyer.com/how-to-use-effective-time-management-to-increase-productivity.html

I also like the idea of a ‘not to do’ list:

http://apps.americanbar.org/lpm/lpt/articles/mgt07061.shtml

But what I also really want is a basic and practical to do list on how to do it. Just simple strategies would do, like emails. Should I answer them first, before doing any thing else; or should they wait a while until I get done that task I really need to do (writing)? What about those big monotonous tasks – a little each day or knock them off so as to clear the way for more interesting endeavours. …

Any ideas?

3 Top Tips from ‘Girlfriends of the Courts’

In Balance, Career, Employment, higher education, law students, women on May 11, 2011 at 2:13 pm

Should I have asked about the dress code in the interview?

A career in the law: be prepared…

The NSW Young Lawyers have just released a great booklet on how to ‘Survive and Thrive in your First Year of Law’ (the pdf is available from their site click here). It is full of honest advice about starting life as a law student, and then as an early career lawyer. Have a look back at our post on Depression and the Dark Side of the Law.

Amicae Curiae has asked some of our ‘girlfriends of the courts’ on their top tips* for starting out in a law career, and here are the best ones (read on):

ps like what you see? You can subscribe to this blog by scrolling to the bottom of the page, or

Read the rest of this entry »

Calling all academic bloggers!

In blogs, higher education, non law, Social Media, women on May 10, 2011 at 7:45 am

This morning’s Age has two pieces on academics and blogging; one starts out as a story of a scuffle between Monash and Melbourne Universities over the ‘Melbourne Model’ (Click here) but ends up discussing Edublog, a proprietary blog platform (Click here). The other piece is a nifty list of ‘academic bloggers’ on a variety of topics (Click here), including one I like, Dr Samantha Thomas’ Discourse (Click here).

The Age inexplicably overlooked Amicae Curiae, and the Castan Centre’s Human Rights Blog (Click here).

Like what you see? You can subscribe to this blog by scrolling to the bottom of the page, or

Read the rest of this entry »

Mothers’ Day – Do You Do It?

In non law, Parenting, women on May 7, 2011 at 5:24 pm

"If I'm not Queen for the day there'll be hell to pay!"

Is your family resolutely not celebrating Mothers’ Day, in an ideological statement against retail enforced false happiness? Or do you do The Works, with visits, presents and flowers to all generations of women in your line? We would love to know! Fill in the poll, or just leave a comment. Read the rest of this entry »

From the Wire Service

In Balance, Employment, Social Media, Solicitors, twitter, women on April 18, 2011 at 2:41 pm

Some highlights (or lowlights?) from Twitter last week:

Results of new study show the (US) legal profession is falling short in efforts to increase diversity http://t.co/FJz4sDd Via @LegalTube.

In the UK “City firms are unwilling…to allow women to stay at work & progress…once they start a family” http://t.co/zC41c8I via @Legal_Week

And in Australia The New Lawyer reported: 60 hour working weeks the norm for most lawyers. http://t.co/h9rqRBY via @neil_watt

While @LexMonitor passed this on: Women Lawyers Have (up to 20%) Lower Billing Rates than Men; why? http://t.co/teSaiF2 from @LarryBodine Read the rest of this entry »

Damned if you do, Damned if you dont, Damn you.

In Balance, non law, Parenting, women on April 7, 2011 at 8:27 pm


I couldn’t help noticing the piece in the Hun yesterday about women with children feeling stigmatised when they went back to work after having kids, and others feeling stigmatised if they stayed home, and didn’t go back to work!

Almost 60 per cent of working mums were made to feel they weren’t taking parenting seriously enough, the survey, conducted on http://www.careforkids.com.au, reported.

Stay-at-home mums did not fare much better – 40 per cent experienced negativity about their decision not to work.

continued> Read the rest of this entry »

and if you are amused by branding (or law and economics)

In Education, higher education, Procrastination on April 5, 2011 at 9:55 am

read this ….

http://leiterlawschool.typepad.com/leiter/2011/04/best-april-fools-joke-yale-ludicrous-school.html

The dark side: depression in the study and practice of law

In Balance, Barristers, law students, Solicitors on April 5, 2011 at 9:51 am

This timed billing sheet is really getting me down.

On 5 April 2011 the Law Report (ABC Radio National) had very honest and frank discussion about alienation and depression among lawyers. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/lawreport/stories/2011/3181665.htm.

The recent study by Tani Massimiliano and Prue Vines law students also showed troubling tendencies towards depression in law students. http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/UNSWLRS/2009/51.html   Continued… Read the rest of this entry »

Seeing is Believing

In law, Social Media, women on April 3, 2011 at 3:53 pm
Amicae Curiae

Amicae Curiae

More to Chew on via twitter

In Balance, Social Media, twitter, women on April 3, 2011 at 3:26 pm

Eva Cox is reviving WETTANK, women’s equity think tank, to put equitable social policy on political agendas, and she needs policy wonks, ideas. Contact her at Eva.CoxATuts.edu.au

Female Judges From Around the Globe Convene in D.C. To discuss Womens’ Rights http://t.co/AbtTnwI

Startling! The @FeministLawPrfs posted this: Word Clouds: Gender & the Vocabulary of Ads for Toys. tinyurl.com/4v8lru3 (reminds Amicae to use Wordle more often too).

Justice Mary Gaudron was a whistleblower: – new info on Senator Heffernan’s false charges against Justice Kirby (via SMH).

Via @lawyerist: An Alternative Career Doesn’t Mean You Can’t Call Yourself A Lawyer http://t.co/c401CS9

there’s more…on procrastination, Royal Weddings, and Parents…

Read the rest of this entry »

Something to chew on: Stories & Links from Twitter.

In Career, Education, Social Media on March 31, 2011 at 7:05 pm

Some interesting stories and links we found on Twitter:

Via @VaultLaw: Does your personality mesh with being a lawyer? http://t.co/I8A2jAL

Women outnumber men on every social media network: Johanna Blakley – The Age http://t.co/hYJYt39

Via @NCWIT: Women Entrepreneur Role Models: Who Would You Name? http://t.co/VU9F5Zp (and Law Role Models?).

Via @feministing: Not Oprah’s Book Club: The Flipside of Feminism: “To the modern woman, work is the meat of her life” http://t.co/VOq3I7H

Via @GdnLaw: After the latest round of white, male appointments, Erika Rackley calls for a more diverse UK supreme court http://t.co/yLgVAiT

Via @ChasLicc No, women are not leaving male-dominated industries simply to have babies http://bit.ly/dUj6Lz

Finally, we are building a list of Australian law women on Twitter. So far the list is here. Any more suggestions? Please include yourself. Reply to us below, or @amicae1 on twitter.

thinking about making flexible work practices work

In Balance, Career, Journals, papers, women on March 28, 2011 at 12:04 pm

Last year Victorian women lawyers released another installment in their series of practical reports on flexible work practices, “Do you Manage”. This report looks at support for flexible work practices by partners and managers. Click here.

Considerable focus on this issue is warranted given the somewhat sobering assessment of such practices in the study by Margaret Thornton and Joanne Bagust, reported in ‘The Gender Trap: Flexible Work in Corporate Legal Practice.” Osgoode Hall Law Journal, Vol. 45, No. 4, pp. 773-811, 2007; ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 08-15.

The concern is that flexible work practices should be a real career pathway not a dead end.

If Justice is a woman, how come there are so few in legal practice?

In Judiciary, law, Photography, women on March 27, 2011 at 11:56 pm

Yale professors Judith Resnik and Dennis Curtis have written a book titled ‘Representing Justice’ on the changing face of justice; images of Madame Justice are shown here, and the review in the Guardian is here. We have always wondered why if Justice is a woman, how is it that so few women practicing in law can find the right ‘balance’ (That’s what the scales are for right?). What do you think?

Work, Snakes and Shoes

In Balance, law, Solicitors on March 27, 2011 at 11:30 pm

My friend Fiona (@Soshoemi) has just posted her thoughts on whether ‘You can really have it all‘. She says

When I went through law school more than 50% of students were female. Twenty years on, I am one of the few still in practice. And with the difficulty of achieving work/life balance in the Law it is hardly a surprise.

Her conclusion; sometimes a Killer Python in the office is needed.

Hearsay: Events

In Career, Employment, Opportunities, Public Lecture, Social Media, women on March 25, 2011 at 10:35 pm

Life as a Government Lawyer: A conversation with Vanessa Twigg

Join the Victorian Women Lawyers for a straightforward conversation on an issue that is far from simple and straightforward: pay and progression challenges faced by women lawyers in government,Wednesday 6 April 2011 1pm-2pm. Click here

‘Will the Revolution be Tweeted? The Role of Social Media in Promoting and Protecting Human Rights’ –  Lunchtime Seminar on Tuesday 5 April 2011, at 472 Bourke Street Melbourne.

Presented by the Human Rights Law  Centre and the Castan Centre for Human Rights Law:

Speakers (more)
Read the rest of this entry »

Don’t Miss These:

In Advocacy, Career, law, Meeting, Opportunities, Public Lecture, Social Media, women on March 23, 2011 at 8:23 pm

Life as a Government Lawyer: A conversation with Vanessa Twigg

Join the Victorian Women Lawyers for a straightforward conversation on an issue that is far from simple and straightforward: pay and progression challenges faced by women lawyers in government,Wednesday 6 April 2011 1pm-2pm. Click here

‘Will the Revolution be Tweeted? The Role of Social Media in Promoting and Protecting Human Rights’ – Seminar on 5 April 2011

The Human Rights Law Resource Centre and the Castan Centre for Human Rights Law  present
Professor Sarah Joseph, Director, Castan Centre for Human Rights Law
Simon Sheikh, National Director, GetUp!
Jonathan Green, Editor, The Drum, ABC
Alex Pagliaro, Refugee Campaign Coordinator, Amnesty International Australia

Date: 12.30pm – 2.00pm on Tuesday, 5 April 2011

Read the rest of this entry »

%d bloggers like this: